Failing to provide a Urine specimen (DR30)

Unless they have a reasonable excuse for not providing, it is an offence when a person either refuses to, or is unable to provide a urine sample for analysis when asked to do so at the police station. Usually the person will have been arrested after taking a roadside breath test which proved positive. The police officer must warn the person that failure to provide a sample may make him/her liable to prosecution.

Failure to provide a specimen after driving or attempting to drive is known as a DR30 offence will carry if convicted a minimum 12-month driving ban, maximum 6-month prison sentence and a £5,000 fine. If the offence is committed within 10 years of a similar conviction or drink driving related conviction, then the disqualification must be for at least 3 years.

In cases where are person is required to provide the specimen, having been found drunk in charge, it is possible to persuade the courts to impose penalty points in certain circumstances.

How we can help

With a 96% success rate, Brian Koffman & Co are specialist motoring offence solicitors and have years of experience in handling these types of cases.

The failing to provide a specimen offence includes provision that this should be without ‘reasonable excuse’. A reasonable excuse would be one which prevents an individual from mentally or physically being unable to provide a specimen, or if there would be a risk to their health. Therefore if we can show that you had a reasonable excuse for not providing a specimen you should be acquitted.

If you have been charged with ‘failing to provide a specimen’ we can advise you on whether you have grounds to contest the charge made. Our knowledge and expertise will ensure we reach the best possible outcome for you.

Contact us today

If you have been charged with failing to provide a specimen we can help. Please contact Brian Koffman & Co on 0161 832 3852 or submit an enquiry.